To make e-cigarettes less tempting to kids, the FDA banned the sale of flavored vaping oils

To make e-cigarettes less tempting to kids, the FDA banned the sale of flavored vaping oils Thursday, with enforcement starting in February. Nicotine vaping products have been hailed by some as a way to “off-ramp” current smokers and minimize the harmful effects of cigarettes. Meanwhile, critics have pointed to the rising number of teens becoming new nicotine users who start with flavored vape products. The FDA has had the authority over the e-cigarette market since Aug. 2016, but has deferred its enforcement authority until now. To date, no such products have been authorized by the FDA — meaning that all vaping products currently on the market in the U.S. are considered illegally marketed and are subject to enforcement, at any time, at the FDA’s discretion, according to the agency. The new enforcement program will target products that use mint or fruit flavors or target children with their marketing. It will not affect menthol- or tobacco-flavored products. “We believe this policy balances the urgency with which we must address the public health threat of youth use of e-cigarette products with the potential role that e-cigarettes may play in helping adul...

Federal judge gives tobacco manufacturers 10 months to comply with planned tighter FDA regulations | Business

If you are a current subscriber please click Sign Up or Login to activate your digital access. If not, please click Sign Up to subscribe. Please support local journalism by becoming a digital subscriber or adding digital to your newspaper subscription. A federal judge agreed Friday to give the Food and Drug Administration a 10-month timeline for tobacco manufacturers to apply to meet planned enhanced regulations. Judge Paul Grimm for the District of Maryland ruled that manufacturers have until May 11 to file pre-market applications for electronic cigarettes and cigars. The premarket standard requires the FDA to consider products’ risks and benefits to the population as a whole, including users and non-users. A coalition of seven public-health and anti-tobacco groups sued the FDA in March 2018 to accelerate the timetable from August 2022. They asked Grimm to provide only four months from his final ruling. Grimm wrote that a 10-month deadline for products in the marketplace would allow “sufficient time for application submissions that present the information that the FDA needs to access the e-cigarette products, while not delaying longer than necessary.” Goldman Sachs analyst Jud...