Federal judge gives tobacco manufacturers 10 months to comply with planned tighter FDA regulations | Business

If you are a current subscriber please click Sign Up or Login to activate your digital access. If not, please click Sign Up to subscribe. Please support local journalism by becoming a digital subscriber or adding digital to your newspaper subscription. A federal judge agreed Friday to give the Food and Drug Administration a 10-month timeline for tobacco manufacturers to apply to meet planned enhanced regulations. Judge Paul Grimm for the District of Maryland ruled that manufacturers have until May 11 to file pre-market applications for electronic cigarettes and cigars. The premarket standard requires the FDA to consider products’ risks and benefits to the population as a whole, including users and non-users. A coalition of seven public-health and anti-tobacco groups sued the FDA in March 2018 to accelerate the timetable from August 2022. They asked Grimm to provide only four months from his final ruling. Grimm wrote that a 10-month deadline for products in the marketplace would allow “sufficient time for application submissions that present the information that the FDA needs to access the e-cigarette products, while not delaying longer than necessary.” Goldman Sachs analyst Jud...

What Can Centella Asiatica Really Do for Red, Dry, Sensitive Skin?

Those of us with sensitive skin already know to be wary of trendy ingredients. But there’s one that’s purported to be good specifically for sensitive or inflamed skin: centella asiatica (also referred to as gotu kola), a leafy plant found in parts of China, Japan, India, Australia, and the U.S. The plant has a long history in traditional medicine, and products containing it have been available internationally for decades. In France, for instance, you might see it sold as Madécassol cream, named for the centella asiatica extract madecassoside. Korean skin-care products containing centella asiatica are often labeled “cica,” indicating they’re meant to calm irritated skin, such as Neogen Real Cica Pads, $20, Innisfree Bija Cica Balm, $25, and Iope Derma Repair Cica Cream, $32. Centella asiatica is also the star ingredient in the cult-favorite Cicapair line from Dr. Jart (including my personal go-to, the Tiger Grass Color Correcting Treatment, $52), as well as La Roche-Posay’s Cicaplast line and Kiehl’s Centella Cica Cream, $43. So, it’s basically everywhere. But can it really help calm your skin? And is it even safe to regularly use something like this on skin that’s prone to bad ...