Man claims cure for blindness as hundreds troop to herbal facility

Mankessim, a commercial town in the Central Region, is noted for foodstuff, fish and meat. But for some time now, people from all walks of life have been trooping to the town not to shop for these items but to seek healing for various eye challenges, including blindness. This follows the discovery of a medicine by a herbalist in the town, which has been acclaimed to cure all kinds of eye diseases, including the dreadful glaucoma, which medical doctors say has no cure.Observation The herbalist, 60-year-old Mr John Kofi Sackey, aka Odopee, is the proprietor of Odopee Herbal Research and Learning Centre at Mankessim. The Daily Graphic has visited the centre twice in the last two weeks and met many people receiving treatment. Unlike the orthodox solutions, which prescribe various forms of surgery and medication, the herbal solution was not applied directly on the eyes. Rather, the herbalist pours the liquid preparation onto a piece of dry wood, puts the wood in a small plastic container for the patient to watch with widely opened eyes for 10 minutes. The Daily Graphic also observed that the patients, most of them above 60 years, repeated the process three times a day. After exposing...

What Can Centella Asiatica Really Do for Red, Dry, Sensitive Skin?

Those of us with sensitive skin already know to be wary of trendy ingredients. But there’s one that’s purported to be good specifically for sensitive or inflamed skin: centella asiatica (also referred to as gotu kola), a leafy plant found in parts of China, Japan, India, Australia, and the U.S. The plant has a long history in traditional medicine, and products containing it have been available internationally for decades. In France, for instance, you might see it sold as Madécassol cream, named for the centella asiatica extract madecassoside. Korean skin-care products containing centella asiatica are often labeled “cica,” indicating they’re meant to calm irritated skin, such as Neogen Real Cica Pads, $20, Innisfree Bija Cica Balm, $25, and Iope Derma Repair Cica Cream, $32. Centella asiatica is also the star ingredient in the cult-favorite Cicapair line from Dr. Jart (including my personal go-to, the Tiger Grass Color Correcting Treatment, $52), as well as La Roche-Posay’s Cicaplast line and Kiehl’s Centella Cica Cream, $43. So, it’s basically everywhere. But can it really help calm your skin? And is it even safe to regularly use something like this on skin that’s prone to bad ...