Got an Ender 3 and looking to explore the filament spectrum? Check out our Ender 3 filament guide to find out which materials are compatible with the machine. The Ender 3 is one of the best printers under $200 right now, desired for its performance and versatility. Even though it’s a budget printer, the features it houses are comparable to many high-end printers out there. A wide range of material choices is one such benefit, so this guide is all about the different filaments that you can print on the Ender 3. With some tweaks, you can get many of the available materials out there to work with your machine. Even so, some specific settings and tweaks are sometimes required. In this article, we’ll have a glance at the stock Ender 3 components, and then we’ll proceed with filament-specific settings for the machine. Just like any other 3D printer, the Ender 3 uses some specific components, which we’ll have a look at one by one. The purpose of informing ourselves on these elements is that we’ll gain a better understanding of how each component affects the performance of various filaments. Polylactic acid (PLA) is undoubtedly the most common 3D printing material. But what does it take...